Ages 11-14

Jr. High students begin using computer science as a problem-solving tool. The 14-week ideaSpark course is grounded in a design thinking process that includes discovery, ideation, prototyping, user testing and sharing. Students develop proficiency in computer programming languages and collaborate on their own creative project, from mobile apps to websites. At the end of the semester, student teams share their projects at a Demo Day event with family, mentors and sponsors in the audience.

Program Goals

  • Experience computational thinking as a way of addressing issues relevant, not just to them, but the world around them
  • Use programming concepts and methods to create applications
  • Collaborate with peers using pair programming and by working in project teams 
  • Explore fields of study and careers to understand the impact of technology
  • Communicate thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written and nonverbal communication skills
 

Spring 2017 Schedule for ideaSpark

Open Enrollment

Families are welcome to register their students for any of the following locations that best fits their schedule and geography. Cost: $200 per student. Financial assistance available.

Location

The MIX Coworking & Creative Space
9125 Diceman Drive, Dallas, TX 75218

Frisco Athletic Center (FAC)
5828 Nancy Jane
Frisco, TX 75035




UT Dallas Arts & Technology Building
800 W. Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080

Bottle Rocket 
14841 Dallas Pkwy, Floor 8
Addison, TX 75254

Day/Time

Saturdays,
10am - 12pm




Saturdays,
12pm - 2pm (ages 10-12)

2:30-4:30pm (ages 13-15)


Saturdays, 
3:30 - 5:30pm




Saturdays, 
10am - 12pm
 

Start Date

Feb. 4




Feb. 4







Feb. 4





Feb. 4

End
Date

May 13




May 13







May 13





May 13
 

no session

Mar. 11




Mar. 4







Mar. 11





Mar. 11

Questions about registration?

Contact Ben Davis, ben@boldidea.org, 972-415-6277


Project Themes

Students use their new coding skills to pursue bold ideas in a variety of real-world themes. Here are just a few:

COMMUNITY PROBLEM SOLVING

Student teams start with a complex challenge about a community problem and then work together to prototype possible solutions. Examples include interactive games that teach recycling, mobile apps that encourage water conservation and websites that challenge classmates to tackle school bullying.